British Airways: ‘We Are Determined To Recruit More Female Pilots’

Written by on December 17, 2014 in Airlines

TV personality, Carol Vorderman, best known for providing consonants and vowels, on Channels four’s Countdown, has got behind British Airways in their bid to push for more female pilots.

Vorderman, herself a qualified pilot, is planning to fly solo around-the-world next year following in the flight path of British pioneer aviator Mildred Bruce. In speaking with British Aiways she said; ‘I always wanted to be a pilot. It was the reason I read Engineering at Cambridge, and ideally would have joined British Airways after, but sadly their training school wasn’t open at that time.’

Airlines have without doubt began to increase their opportunities for female pilots but there still remains a glass ceiling. British Airlines proudly admit that they have more female pilots than any other airline, with nearly 200 flying with them, however, it is still exceptionally marginal.

According to – Women Of Aviation Worldwide – approximately 2% of all aircraft mechanics are females, less than 6 %  of all pilots are females, and the percentage of female aeronautical engineers hovers around 10 %.

British Airways campaign is hoping to attract even more women into their cadet programme. Their First Officer, Emily Lester, said ‘The British Airways Pilot programme has allowed me to realise my dream of becoming an airline pilot. After an intensive training programme I am now flying to destinations throughout Europe and would encourage anyone thinking of a career as a pilot to apply.’

About the Author

About the Author: After completing a degree in Journalism, I discovered I had a keen interest in content writing. I am now using that to write articles on the transport sector. You can find my posts on Total Rail and Blue Sky. .

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